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Cold Weather Gear- After Action Reports

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of zeerf zeerf 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #34521
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    As we are moving into winter I was curious about the communities experience and “been there done that” with cold weather gear. As we all may be in a last minute buying spree in the next month; I would like to find out WHAT WORKS and WHAT DOESN’T in very cold USA weather (not arctic).

    There is a lot of info on the forum; but this might be a good place to put all the expertise on the subject.

    Ammo-

    Canteens versus Camelbacks-

    Water purification-

    Boots and socks/ snow shoes-

    Personal hygiene-

    Lubrication/cleaning of AR platforms and bolt actions

    Care of webbing, packs, sleeping bags-

    Magazines-

    Vapor barriers, wool etc-

    Metal buckles, plastic buckles, buttons, velcro-

    Fire starting-

    Cooking gear-

    Insulation while sitting/sleeping/observation post

    Optics-

    Anything else you all have good or bad experience with

    #34522
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    The one thing I have heard repeatedly from cold weather warriors is that water bladders freeze up not matter how hard you try to keep them usable. The cold weather guys seem to like canteens or nalgene bottles carried UPSIDE down, so that the water freezes at the bottom of the bottle versus the top.

    Speaking of water; I have also repeatedly read that water filters also freeze up. So one either needs to boil water or use tablets.

    #34523
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Another tidbit I read from the cold weather expedition guys on Mt. Washington is to NEVER wash your face and hands with soap when out in the boonies. You need the natural oil on your face and hands to prevent your skin from ripping apart from the cold.

    #34530
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    Anonymous

    To answer to these questions, accurately, requires that you first know the approximate duration you expect to be in those conditions. For example six hours, or six days, or six months, and if there will be any relief, or if it is six months of saturation till spring arrives.

    #34532
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    Anonymous

    The entire winter. The guide being the books by Max. Even if there is a stand down, there will still be patrols etc

    #34534
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    Anonymous

    The entire winter. The guide being the books by Max. Even if there is a stand down, there will still be patrols etc

    So there would be times when people would come into a shelter….??? Or is the entire winter in an unheated environment (outdoors).

    For example, once I have prepped my winter use firearms, I do not bring them into a heated environment, they stay outdoors. This mitigates many problems with reliability.

    #34535
    Profile photo of Free Chicken Dinner
    RRS
    Participant

    I spend a week or more at my deer camp with precious little heat and what I do is set my water out in the sun if there is any sun. You have to use what nature gives you.

    Tactical training for Liberty, Fraternity, Excellence

    #34576
    Profile photo of Rowland
    Rowland
    Participant

    Water filters will freeze and break if exposed to below freezing conditions for long periods. Few of then will let you get all of the water out, so your option is to use it, set it in the sun and hope it dries out before it gets cold. Most water filter “breaks” will not be visible from the outside. Microfractures in the filtering parts will simply let bad stuff through instead of actually filtering. Flow rate is your big hint. If the flow is suddenly higher, it’s not filtering.

    For boots you have to balance weight with insulation and that balance is different for different people. I have boots with 400g of insulation and they’re cold if I’m just sitting, like in a deer stand. I have boots with 1000g and they’re heavy and tough to lug gear and yourself over hill and dale. But they’re warm!

    Many of us are hunting mice while lions devour the land. -Leonard Ravenhill

    #34614
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    To answer to these questions, accurately, requires that you first know the approximate duration you expect to be in those conditions. For example six hours, or six days, or six months, and if there will be any relief, or if it is six months of saturation till spring arrives.

    Aj makes a good point here..

    Surviving in the cold can be tricky and while no two situations can be alike, there is a base each individual should start from and learn to operate in (their tolerance zone)so they can adapt and be flexible to changing situations. Being a civilian and an individual you will never get the answers you need w/o GETTING OUT and throwing yourself into the frozen hell. I have loads of cold weather experiences but posts like this would require me to write a book to answer the open ended question properly. It simply cannot be done.

    For patrols such as Maxs book suggest in his books you need to understand in a world like that THERE IS NO HELP COMING and there is NO CHOPPER or rescue services to evac you if things go wrong. There probably is not going to be any help coming if you lose a gun battle either. Chances are you will only have one or two guys with you to help should anything go wrong. I recommend planning like you’re going to be alone. You are everything you need to get you out of a bad situation and survive when things go wrong. Patrols like that will be a constant battle of body heat retention and expelling-and perspiration regulation. From your feet to your head. You need to be able to stay dry and eat the right foods or its all down hill and you’re gonna end up a grease stain on the ground come spring. You need extra clothing to rotate in and out of and ways to dry it when you run out.

    For heat retention and regulation I recommend baggy clothing to get the best longevity from any rotation. I never use a belt, I use suspenders to promote air flow. This also promotes ease of movement. With baggy clothes you can trap the air to warm up when needed and let it flow to cool off in high movement situations. One of these Norwegian army net shirts can be golden in this task. They will help dry perspiration when venting and also trap air in small pockets when you close up to get warm. I recommend finding out where you hot spots are for understanding your personal heat regulation needs. For example mine are around my wrists/forearm, neck, chest. The important of knowing this cannot be overstated.

    I recommend staying away from micorfleece. I recommend wool when you can get it. Wool watch cap, multiple wool gloves (old school OD inserts), wool neck toques, wool sweater(s), wool long johns, wool socks etc etc.. I also recommend staying away form this whisking away underclothing because if you have to stop moving and your wet, your gonna go hypothermia and die if you cannot change out of it. For me in my Evasion routine, making visual and audible signatures man not be conducive with staying alive. Wool insulation will prevent this. Most good wool will retain 80% of its insulation ability when wet. If you want good wool I recommend scouring second hand stores for old stuff made before the great outsourcing of American industry and the use of shitty materials..

    Lets start with the above before we jump on the other topics.. Ill help where I can from a Survivalist POV, not a gun fighter.

    Bergmann

    #34687
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Thanks

    I am assuming that you have a place to go during the winter, but that you would be going out on patrols for up to week. Using Max’s latest book in which the resistance was winter-quartered but still maintained operations.

    Obviously I am just guessing, and really can’t provide any more details other than its cold, there is a lot of snow, and the bad guys are doing the same thing.

    A lot of us have the Poly long underwear but if we spend a bit more can buy merino wool. Good input. Same goes for belts. I have a bunch of sets of good USA quality suspenders; so I did something right :)

    I haven’t seen any good quality bulky WOOL watch caps in awhile…except for the little, tight ones.

    #34689
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    #34701
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    That link is a good brand. Ive always looked for the one with that style label and its needs to say MADE IN THE USA or you risk the identical Chinese copy that might be made with dog or other nefarious materials. The labels are almost identical.

    I use US issue Polypro bottoms for my PT use. In fact i took it out last week last week and started using the bottoms. I hate it but its work for that and saves wear ans tear on my good shit. Its always plenty soaked by time i get back to the truck and home. I use to use it all the time but gradually phased it out and I learned and found what I needed at the second hand stores..

    Bergmann

    #34745
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I’ll second on the above watch cap. I have two of those and they are the genuine article.

    I still have my issue sets of wool long johns from the 90s black-boot Army. Good warm stuff.

    #34900
    Profile photo of zeerf
    zeerf
    Participant

    Anyone use or have any input on base layers such as: Eberlestock airbase?

    Bergmann, I am going to order one of this Norwegian army net shirts for sure.

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