Small Unit Tactics contact patriot-dawn Patriot Rising

Feedback on CRS & DCH Classes

Home Forums Tactics & Leadership Skill at Arms (HEMS) Feedback on CRS & DCH Classes

This topic contains 34 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Mountain Mom gramma 1 year, 4 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 31 through 35 (of 35 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #49906
    Profile photo of DuaneH
    DuaneH
    Participant

    And Lo! From the East, came TacGun!

    :good:

    Does that mean i am an apostle?

    Appleseed.
    NOV2008 IBC
    OCT2009 FT Stewart
    OCT2010 RBC Known Distance Rifleman
    OCT2014&2015 Long Distance Rifleman
    JUN2015 1000 Yds

    I.C.E/JAN2011 Combat Focus Shooting

    Tactical Response
    JUN2009 Fighting Pistol
    JUL2009 Fighting Rifle
    AUG2010 Immediate Action Medical
    NOV2012 Way of the Rifle

    Mountain Guerrilla/JUN2013-Irregular Warfare

    MVT
    SEP2013&2014-CRCD
    OCT2014-CP
    MAR2015-RC1=RIFLEMAN!
    AUG2015-CCC
    SEP2016-CTT
    OCT2016-FOF
    TEAM COYOTE!

    #49915
    Profile photo of Mountain Mom
    gramma
    Participant

    LOL… You guys are silly – but that’s one way the classes are different: we do have FUN, but it’s real clear when it’s all business too.

    I don’t always get the right words out of my brain, to say what I’m meaning to say. But let me see if these observations help push things closer to a good idea for marketing.

    – MVT doesn’t just teach & practice drills for the sake of the drills and muscle memory; we learned WHY these skills were important and the application of the basic skills, to potential real-life situations. The usual square range classes focus primarily on whether or not you understand the fundamentals of the skill – and then they move on.

    – I learned how to tell from my target more of what I need to work on in grip, trigger pull, etc. That encourages me to practice more on my own, because I know to try to correct or pay attention to.

    – The malfunction drills were the most important info for me. But I’m weird. I was always afraid to deal with a problem – and that’s a hindrance to practice, living alone like I do. I’m confident now that I can deal with it and get back on target.

    This wasn’t covered at all in my first CCW class or NRA basic pistol.

    – Drawing from concealed wasn’t covered either, and there was no discussion or practice of shooting from cover. Shooting and moving wasn’t even on the radar and the little bit we did in class was a great lesson in how many things have to be settled internally – so they’re automatic – before shooting while moving is even possible.

    – Shooting one-handed, weak hand, drawing with the weak hand… these things were also “new material” for me. My previous classes included people who didn’t know how their guns operated or how to load them. There was no time to teach or practice these other skills.

    – Those other classes were max 4 hrs long. 1/2 was classroom; 1/2 was shooting. Two 8 hr days makes a big difference in what a person retains after the class. And 1st Sarge was right: after 2 days, I barely took notice of the holster anymore, I was already used to it.

    So, for me – it was just the right step from what little I knew, to adding a chunk of things to work on – so that I can safely move on to the next level after a bit. I knew I didn’t know very much. And I knew strange things that didn’t matter – and didn’t know the stuff that does. And the class helped me know which was which – and what to work on.

    So overall, I’d describe the class as a transition class, that teaches tactical applications of the concealed handgun. It puts basic pistol skills to work, in practice designed to be applied in realistic self-defense scenarios.

    Or something like that.

    #49916
    Profile photo of wheelsee
    wheelsee
    Participant

    @gramma

    :good:

    Excellent observations, including from other classes. As an NRA instructor, I always tell the students this is a “basic” class…..we give MVT information to our students for those interested….which brings up ego – I’ve never viewed other instructors as “competition” in the sense of closely guarded secrets. If someone needs something I can’t provide (skill set or timing), I refer them to someone who can.

    Which is heavier - a soldier's pack or a slave's chains? Napoleon

    Strength, Honor. Maximus (Gladiator)

    If you tolerate evil, you yourself are evil.
    Col Hugo Martinez, Commander Search Bloc

    William, in The Republic - CRS/CTT 2017, HEAT 2/CQB/FonF 2018, DCH 2018

    #49917
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    @gramma
    Thank you for your detailed description.
    Am getting started for today and will spend all day getting ready for this class and driving out there tomorrow.
    It’s a lot to get ready for and quite a bit outside my comfort zone.
    Am really putting myself out there making this trip, but have the mindset that I have heard enough good stuff about the place, the people and the courses that it will all be worth it and to enjoy the adventure, whatever happens.

    #50012
    Profile photo of Mountain Mom
    gramma
    Participant

    I had trepidations too Wendy – I’m a 60 yr old, out of shape (but not decrepit yet) woman with no background whatsoever in this kind of thing. My family hunted, though and I was introduced to shooting as a kid… and then wasn’t interested most of my life.

    It was FINE; I worried about stuff I didn’t need to. I had a great time and learned so much and even got my jeep nice & muddy. :-)

Viewing 5 posts - 31 through 35 (of 35 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.