Small Unit Tactics contact patriot-dawn Patriot Rising

Observations and some advice

Home Forums The Armory – Gear and Equipment Observations and some advice

This topic contains 53 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Joe (G.W.N.S.) Joe (G.W.N.S.) 1 week, 5 days ago.

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 54 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #18955
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    After the combined CTT/CP class, I am going to pass on some advice and tips on some things I observed and some things I was asked about. DiznNC has hit on some of these before, but some of them need to be repeated.

    Get rid of the damn ball caps. This applies specifically to field work. Ball caps are great for the range as they integrate well with earpro. They are also great for proclaiming your message with patches or as an advertisement for gear that you use. They stand out like a strobe light when you wear them for field work. I was able to show that pretty quickly on Day 2 of the CP class when the class moved into the hasty ambush.

    Camo-Everybody has their personal preference for camo patterns based on where they live or the group that they work with. Pick one and go with it. Just be aware that some patterns work better than others. The one pattern that I will tell you to stay away from is UCP. Unless you are going to be in a rock quarry or a gravel pit, it sucks. It stands out like a neon sign. Some people may decide not to use a pattern because they don’t want to stand out, especially if you live in an urban or suburban area. That’s fine and logical. Go with earth tones. Stay away from bright colors on everything to include your gloves, stuff sacks and t-shirts.

    Buy clothing that fits. The uniforms that you are buying either new or surplus were designed to be loose fitting. Makes for ease of movement, better air flow and layering during cold weather. You don’t want the pants baggy to the point that the crotch is in the vicinity of your knees nor do you want them so tight that it cuts off blood flow to everything below the waist. You definitely don’t want to look like a hipster in skinny jeans. Tops, either standard shirts or combat shirts, again personal preference. I like the standard ACU cut tops. Combat shirts, there are different choices out there, I like the ones like Max wears. Gives you more flexibility with the zipper and being able to roll your sleeves up. Stay away from long sleeve tight fitting t-shirts. They will cause you to overheat as your body can’t regulate it’s temperature. Going commando or not. That is definitely a personal choice. Find out what works for you. Several will recommend some type of compression shorts. I recommend going commando. But for it to work right, your pants have to fit properly. These are thing you have to test out now and see what works. Waiting for an event to happen and then trying to figure it out will put you behind the power curve.

    Socks. Stop wearing standard athletic socks you buy in bulk. They will destroy your feet in the long run. Get socks made out of merino wool. Your feet will thank you for it. I have used Smartwools for years, even in the heat in Afghanistan. The reason I like Smartwools is that they have different styles depending on how much cushion you want, even thick ones for winter.

    Boots. I was asked about this during class. This is one thing you can’t skimp on. You need to find boots that fit you well and will take abuse and last. You also want something that has ankle support. I use Lowa boots exclusively and have for the past 15 years. Even while deployed. You pay a little more for them, but they are worth every penny. They have several different styles, to include a duty line, some with goretex lining. Depending on where you live you may need different pairs for winter and summer. Think about that now. If you live in a marshy environment, you may want to think about jungle boots. The old school issue ones work great in this type of environment. Two other brands that I can recommend is Meindl and Asolo. If you have never been fitted for a good outdoor boot, go to REI or a good outdoor store and get fitted properly. I t will make a all the difference in the world.

    Velcro-It is loud as hell and you might as well be wearing bells. If you use a riggers belt, get one with a cobra buckle, takes care of the velcro sound. If you have pants and shirts that have velcro on the pockets, check out this link for a fix for that
    http://www.fighterdesignusa.com/magnetic-retrofit-kits/

    Shemaghs-great piece of kit with all kinds of uses. Don’t wear it like a wild west desperado who is about to hold up a stage coach. Unless you are in a sand storm or dust storm.

    Gaiters-I recommended these to someone in another thread. For cold weather and snow I use them religiously. I use the ones made by Outdoor Research. They also come in handy for wet weather. OR also makes short ones for hot weather use.

    Cotton, stay the hell away from it. Especially during cold weather. Cotton kills. It holds moisture and does not dry out quick.

    These are just some observations. Others will have a different opinion or even disagree with what I listed here. That’s fine. I am not claiming to be the guru on this stuff, just passing on some experience with kit that I know that works.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #18957
    Profile photo of Max Velocity
    Max
    Keymaster

    Note: This is not Max’s response/content. Just a glitch from the transition to subscription.

    I second on the smart wool socks. I use the heavyweight year round in Arizona

    Yes at 100+ heavyweight wool insulated your feet from your boot bottoms and the wool pulls the sweat away from the skin acting like a candle wick. The dry fast and if you go swimming unscheduled they dry fast.

    Gaiters- I use the same OR as above, I like the tall ones , they keep most of the thorns and asst stickers out of your boots and keep the wet out as well. It took me a long time to try them and I’ll never go back without them. The brits got that right a long time ago.

    Gloves- I see a lot of references to cold weather gloves but you should wear gloves all the time to protect your hands. I left the palm of my left hand on a car hood 20+ years ago because I was paying attention to something else.Light leather and kevlar like the ones marketed as anti knife work well. A light glove or mechanics glove will avoid this. If bright colors are what you can find just dye them black or brown or green or whatever makes you happy

    Again like 1sg just observations but its the little things that slow you down and effect performance, not just the web gear and packs

    #18977
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    I like DCUs and my boonie DCU hats but want to move my front pockets to the sleeves. I want some MTP combat shirts but will probally just go with Tan and Sage Green.

    I plan on wearing UCP to class maybe, why I have two combat shirts sitting in the closet.

    I donated my BDUs to CAP.

    I could wear flight suits but then I would look like God and I would have a whisky with me everywhere I went.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #18978
    Profile photo of riflemaniv
    riflemaniv
    Participant

    First Sergeant wrote:
    “Velcro-It is loud as hell and you might as well be wearing bells. If you use a riggers belt, get one with a cobra buckle, takes care of the velcro sound. If you have pants and shirts that have velcro on the pockets, check out this link for a fix for that.”

    Am I missing a link?

    CTT1504, NODF 1504, CP 1610

    #18980
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    First Sergeant wrote:
    “Velcro-It is loud as hell and you might as well be wearing bells. If you use a riggers belt, get one with a cobra buckle, takes care of the velcro sound. If you have pants and shirts that have velcro on the pockets, check out this link for a fix for that.”

    Am I missing a link?

    Damn, it got left out. Here is the link and I will go back and add it to the post.

    http://www.fighterdesignusa.com/magnetic-retrofit-kits/

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #18981
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    thequietsurvivalist, thanks for the reminder about gloves. I forgot to add that to the list. I agree with you completely. I passed that on during the class. Gloves, in my opinion are a must for hot or cold weather. Hot weather they protect your hands from all kinds of nicks and scrapes. And when your weapon gets hot, they will protect your hands from the heat.

    One other addition, Permethrin. Get some and treat your clothes with it. It saves on having to use bug spray and depending on witch bug spray you use, it cuts down on the smell.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #18984
    Profile photo of Wild Bill
    Wild Bill
    Participant

    Besides the whole melting issue which is cooler polyester/cotton or nylon/cotton or is there no real difference?

    CTT 1511, LN 1

    “I do believe that, where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence..." - Gandhi

    #18987
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    One other addition, Permethrin. Get some and treat your clothes with it. It saves on having to use bug spray and depending on witch bug spray you use, it cuts down on the smell.

    Yes indeed. I got a brand new set of multi-cam ACUs already treated with Permethrin, from our local tactical store. $39.99 a piece for pants and jacket. No ticks or chiggers so far.

    #18992
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    I like buttons but prefer the ease of use of zippers on sleeves.

    The problem with zippers is you have to get quality zippers that can work well.

    For Shirts I do like the Woolrich Elite lightweight shirts. Sage Green like my flight kit is works well in lots of environments.

    Boonies are great and my Size 7 head gets a lot of use from my issued DCU boonie.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #19000
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Just a thought on Velcro:
    Belts – I always had trouble with the rigger’s belt and velcro. Even a Cobra buckle didn’t quite fix the problem, since I found myself wanting to adjust the belt anyway during hikes. I do not have this problem with my British Tactical Hippo 3-Row MOLLE belt, since it has a British roll-pin buckle.
    Utility Pouches – I just go with a surplus British Osprey water bottle pouch. I put a velcro silencer on it and use the buckles. Being the older type, they’re still a bit noisey to open. I’ll soon try the British Tactical version that has a side-release buckle.
    Mag Pouches – Correct me if I’m wrong, but I’m not so worried about velcro on mag pouches. I figure that if I’m having to reload, the enemy will probably be aware of my presence.

    A question on uniforms: what would you suggest for hot-weather shirts?Specifically, I’m looking for surplus gear (at a lower cost). My Flecktarn shirts are great in the fall and spring, but too hot for summer.

    #19011
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    Besides the whole melting issue which is cooler polyester/cotton or nylon/cotton or is there no real difference?

    I prefer the poly/cotton.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #19012
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    Just a thought on Velcro:
    Belts – I always had trouble with the rigger’s belt and velcro. Even a Cobra buckle didn’t quite fix the problem, since I found myself wanting to adjust the belt anyway during hikes. I do not have this problem with my British Tactical Hippo 3-Row MOLLE belt, since it has a British roll-pin buckle.
    Utility Pouches – I just go with a surplus British Osprey water bottle pouch. I put a velcro silencer on it and use the buckles. Being the older type, they’re still a bit noisey to open. I’ll soon try the British Tactical version that has a side-release buckle.
    Mag Pouches – Correct me if I’m wrong, but I’m not so worried about velcro on mag pouches. I figure that if I’m having to reload, the enemy will probably be aware of my presence.

    A question on uniforms: what would you suggest for hot-weather shirts?Specifically, I’m looking for surplus gear (at a lower cost). My Flecktarn shirts are great in the fall and spring, but too hot for summer.

    Velcro on mag pouches when in contact, correct, when things get noisy, it won’t make a difference. But you may have to access your magazines at some other time when noise could be a liability. At one time, velcro on everything was all the rage, not so much anymore. Most use some other type of retention now such as shock cord, fast-ex buckles or compression like the Taco pouches. If we are telling you to ditch the velcro, it’s for a reason. I am not trying to sell anything here, just passing on some knowledge about what works and what doesn’t.

    If you are using surplus Bundeswehr flectarn uniforms, I can see where they could be a little warm for summer, depending on where you live. And they like the cut of their uniforms to be a little tighter than the U.S. does. Their issue desert uniforms are of a lighter material. For hot weather, I use the issue MC/OCP uniforms that I have from my last deployment. I use those year round. You can find those on the surplus market. I am not as big a fan of the combat shirts as some are, I like having the option of taking my blouse off if I want to.

    One thing to get used to now is wearing long sleeves year round. It helps protect your arms form sun, wind, bugs and scrapes. In the summer you can turn the sleeves up a couple of turns.

    Some of this comes down to getting used to being not as comfortable as you are used to being. In other words, when an event happens and everything goes sideways, things are gonna suck. Get used to being hot or cold, dirty, wet, tired, sweaty, hungry, thirsty and so on.

    As I said initially, different opinions. Find what works for you, but you have to test it under the conditions you are going to use it in as close as possible. If you are not training in classes or on your own and are just getting stuff to have just in case, you will be disapointed when it comes time to use the stuff for real.

    53GR, sorry for going off on a tangent. Hope i answered your question.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #19015
    Profile photo of Wild Bill
    Wild Bill
    Participant

    Besides the whole melting issue which is cooler polyester/cotton or nylon/cotton or is there no real difference?

    I prefer the poly/cotton.

    Thanks First Sergeant I served back in the days before poly/cotton or nylon/cotton blends and thought since where I live is hot and humid that before I purchased anything it was best to ask since I have always been able to put on enough to get warm but was never able to take off enough to get cool.

    CTT 1511, LN 1

    “I do believe that, where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence..." - Gandhi

    #19016
    Profile photo of Joe (G.W.N.S.)
    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
    Moderator

    Find what works for you, but you have to test it under the conditions you are going to use it in as close as possible.

    :good:

    #19018
    Profile photo of DiznNC
    DiznNC
    Participant

    Good info, 1st Sgt. This used to be common knowledge stuff, but with all the clutter on the internet, this stuff needs to be addressed by someone who actually does it currently out at MVT.

    I prefer the older style “BDU” style uniforms myself, if given a preference. I think buttons make the most sense on pockets, although small Velcro squares are usually acceptable. Back in the day, we put the chest pockets on the arms, and the waist pockets on the chest. The “RAID” mods standardize this practice, which led to the later ACU’s.

    I prefer NYCO material, but again, this is just a preference if I have a choice. The NYCO seems to be the best balance of durability and comfort under most conditions.

    With all that said, I am currently running the surplus OCP’s cuz they’re (relatively) cheap and available. And the pattern works extremely well, despite my earlier reservations.

    So there are several factors that get a vote. Including your wallet.

    Boots. After having run around West Virginia a little bit, I found good fitting boots are a must. Not only up and down, but SIDEWAYS loads, as on the military crest of hills. If there is any slop in your boot fit, you might have some issues. Can’t argue a bit with 1st Sgt’s boot choices. I’m currently running the Lowa Zephyrs. I like the non-gortex models, and add Sealskin gortex liners when needed.

    Socks. I ran both Smartwool and classic rag wool socks. If I had to chose, I’d go with expedition weight Smartwools for general, all-around use. For really shitty weather, I might go with rag wool and liner socks. Or just the liners underneath the Sealskins. Any good foot powder will work. Highly recommend you bring some. Also some moleskins in your boo-boo kit.

    Underwear. I prefer the compression shorts (Champion Powercore @ Target) but of course YMMV. Again wanted to mention the Mennen Power Speed Stick, for rash and friction control (crotch, pits, feet). I use this in lieu of old school cornstarch.

    Velcro. Yeah. This is one thing that’s gotten completely out of hand, due to the de-emphasis of good fieldcraft from the current GWOT. In our terrain and situation, large gobs of this stuff in not advised. Especially if you envision doing any recce work.

    Gloves. This is a very good idea. You are doing a lot of weapons manipulation, and running around in the bush. So at least light weight contact gloves are a very good idea. I used to use flight gloves quite a bit, nowadays, I really like the Mechanix’s brand, which even come in MC these days. A small tube of superglue in the boo-boo kit will help with “weather cracks” in you fingers, from all the hard use. Old climbers trick. Fill up the crack and drive on. (Ointment and bandaids interfere with use.)

    Shamagh, scarf, etc. We used to run the OD scarf from the 1st Aid kit. The new Shamaghs do the same thing. Just rememeber to tuck it in well enough that it doesn’t interfere with your weapon’s manip. This was our field-expedient TQ before all the new stuff came out.

    This is good advice form a very current 1st Sgt. Read and heed!

    CTT 1505, NODF 1505, CP 1503, LN 1, RC II, Rifleman

    #19022
    Profile photo of SeanT
    SeanT
    Moderator

    ditto on the Merino Wool socks. I switched a few years ago and will never wear cotton socks again let alone those cheap poly/cotton whatevers.

    Standing on 140 degree asphalt all day, you can appreciate the insulating factor from the sole of your boots.

    #19026
    Profile photo of Joe (G.W.N.S.)
    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
    Moderator

    Standing on 140 degree asphalt all day, you can appreciate the insulating factor from the sole of your boots.

    This is a point missed by many, I wear Merino Wool Ragg Socks year round for this very reason.

    I am a big believer in Polypro X-Static Sock Liners for field work, they help wick moisture away from skin, help prevent friction that causes blisters, and the X-Static helps greatly with hygiene.

    X-STATIC

    Proven by United States special forces, NASA, and Olympic athletes X-STATIC has a rich heritage of delivering superior performance.

    The benefits of X-STATIC have been validated by studies at prestigious institutions throughout the world for more than a decade.

    For more than 2,000 years, silver has been used for it’s antimicrobial properties in everything from drinking vessels to military field dressings. Now, with our superior technology we deliver the benefits of silver to textiles. We combine best in class antimicrobial & anti-odor protection with the benefit of body temperature regulation.

    X-STATIC is made by permanently bonding 99.9% pure metallic silver to the surface of the fiber. Not a nanotechnology or a complex
    chemical formula, just natural silver.

    X-STATIC fibers and fabrics deliver 100% surface area of silver to maximize performance, yet they remain soft and flexible.

    X-Static is used in many different products including T-shirts, briefs/boxers, and thermal underwear.

    Why do I emphasize this?

    Living in the field you will lack many of the methods of hygiene we tend to take for granted. Use of these with just the occasional water rinse will prevent most of the “funk” that lack of hygiene causes.

    Of course there are many field expedient ways for practicing hygiene in the field that you should also learn.

    Gortex lined boots can be great, however if you spend as much time in and out of water that’s above the boots, ventilation such as variations of jungle boot is a better choice for me.

    Gloves :good: have a pair slightly larger for use with wool glove liners for cold weather. Carry two pairs of glove liners to swap out while one is drying.

    Permethrin :good:

    Eye protection is a must for me, both tinted and clear.

    I am not as effective when I can’t see! :yes:

    #19029
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    All good comments guys. Let’s keep them coming. These are all the little things that guys like me take for granted that some may not have ever been exposed to.

    Standing on 140 degree asphalt all day, you can appreciate the insulating factor from the sole of your boots.

    This is a point missed by many, I wear Merino Wool Ragg Socks year round for this very reason.

    Living in the field you will lack many of the methods of hygiene we tend to take for granted. Use of these with just the occasional water rinse will prevent most of the “funk” that lack of hygiene causes.

    Of course there are many field expedient ways for practicing hygiene in the field that you should also learn.

    Gortex lined boots can be great, however if you spend as much time in and out of water that’s above the boots, ventilation such as variations of jungle boot is a better choice for me.

    Gloves :good: have a pair slightly larger for use with wool glove liners for cold weather. Carry two pairs of glove liners to swap out while one is drying.

    Permethrin :good:

    Eye protection is a must for me, both tinted and clear.

    I am not as effective when I can’t see! :yes:

    G.W.N.S good points. As you stated, gortex lined boots can be a problem if you are continuously swamping them with water doing stream crossings etc., you are going to have major problems. On the other hand they may be a life saver during winter conditions. Again, one of those things that each individual needs to figure out for themselves.

    Another point that G.W.N.S. brought up that needs to be addressed aggressively is eye-pro. Eye protection is a must. You need to be wearing eye-pro when you are shooting, no excuses. You need to get a set of eye-pro with interchangeable lenses, traditional dark gray and clear lenses. The clear lenses are for night time. The last thing you want is an eye branch to one of your eyes, it hurts. And during an event, finding an eye doctor may be difficult. Stay away from yellow or amber lenses, they mask some things that you would otherwise be able to see. You want impact resistant eye-pro. There are plenty on the surplus market that you can pick up relatively cheap. Smith Optics, Oakley, Revision, ESS, Wiley X are some of the brands to look for.

    Diz, thanks. You are correct that most of the field-craft techniques have been lost. But there are still a few of us around that can pass on this info. The things we have talked about here and the the post you have made are very important to surviving.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #19034
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Could someone explain how they organize their gear in their ruck sacks i.e. use of stuff sacks and dry sacks? What size/brand dry sacks are recommended?

    Also, how many and what size bungee cords are recommended for tarp/poncho type shelters?

    These topics have been touched on in other threads, but I didn’t see the specifics I was looking for.

    Thanks.

    #19037
    Profile photo of Max Velocity
    Max
    Keymaster

    Note: This is not Max’s response/content. Just a glitch from the transition to subscription.

    Good info, thanks for sharing.

    #19039
    Profile photo of Mike H
    Mike H
    Participant

    flint, Max, Diz, 1stSGT, and others have great posts about ruck organization.

    Since CP class in May…I stuffed my thermo pad and summer bag(poncho liner inside a goretex bivy(got that idea from Diz). That mess is then stuffed inside the ruck(this is after filling and positioning a 100ltr bladder in the interior pouch of the ruck. Next a have a USMC fleece top, MVT shield w/ poles/pegs/bungees, ammo in bandoleer, rations, spare canteen, and etool. I have an upper compartment with a t-shirt, socks, watch cap for sleeping, hygene kit, TP, and small boo-boo kit. My ruck has molle straps so I could add some pouches.

    I have 4 bungees earth tone around 2 ft in length along with some cordage. Every deployment of shelter is probably going to different from the last.

    "These are not men, but devils" --Colonel Francisco de Paula-Milan, Mexican Army, Camerone 30 April 1863

    #19045
    Profile photo of Wild Bill
    Wild Bill
    Participant

    Looks like some of the issues concerning uniforms Velcro zippers and buttons are being addressed in in the new OCP.

    OCP ACU – The New Army Combat Uniform @ TacticalGear.com http://tacticalgear.com/ocp-acus

    CTT 1511, LN 1

    “I do believe that, where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence..." - Gandhi

    #19046
    Profile photo of Rob
    busyguyintville
    Participant

    Hey Top, I’ve not heard your admonition on lens color anywhere before:

    “Stay away from yellow or amber lenses, they mask some things that you would otherwise be able to see.”

    The eye doctor who specializes in shooting/safety glasses recommended blue-blocking lens that are a slight yellow color. I’m personally sold on the blue-blocking aspect (much better detail pickup), but I don’t know about the yellow color masking things as you assert. Do you have any references for that? Thanks.

    MVT Rifleman. TC3/RMP/CRCD Alumni.
    Southern Illinois Area

    #19047
    Profile photo of Ralph Kramden
    HiDesertRat
    Participant

    busyguyintville,

    I cannot give you any scientific reasoning for my observation on ‘blue-blocking’ lenses. However, they were quite the rage some time ago, I tried them and initially they did seem to be great. However, after repeated use, my vision began to suffer and diminish to the point I stopped using them. Within a day or so, vision restored. YMMV. Give it a whirl and see what happens. We all know looking through rose colored glasses isn’t good for us, maybe blue may be detrimental also… or perhaps I need to consult my genealogy records and rule out simian and reptilian ancestors and such.

    #19051
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    Hey Top, I’ve not heard your admonition on lens color anywhere before:

    “Stay away from yellow or amber lenses, they mask some things that you would otherwise be able to see.”

    The eye doctor who specializes in shooting/safety glasses recommended blue-blocking lens that are a slight yellow color. I’m personally sold on the blue-blocking aspect (much better detail pickup), but I don’t know about the yellow color masking things as you assert. Do you have any references for that? Thanks.

    “Top”? Why did you have to go and question my parentage? I have never met you but I don’t run around typing insults about you. ;-)

    In a way, you answered your own question. Yellow/Amber lenses are great for shooting. I don’t know if it’s the case now, but it used to be what bulls-eye, skeet and trap shooters used a lot. It cut out the haze.

    But here’s the kicker, they are great for shooting, but not observing. Some guys started using yellow/amber lenses in Iraq and A-stan. It got to the point that those colors were specifically banned for use. Now you may be asking, “what in the hell has that got to do with me trying to get ready for when the SHTF?”. The reason they were banned is when using those lenses, it prevented you from seeing the glint off of wires in the sun or from seeing the wire at all. Bad things can happen if you miss seeing a wire that may be connected to an IED. This all came about from the investigations that were done after each IED strike. There were specific teams that would analyze everything about the strike, to not only try to track down the guys that did it, but to figure out how to keep people from getting blown up.

    Lots of people get wrapped up in the whole shooting part of getting ready for SHTF(and the gear part), and that is part of it. Shoot, move, communicate. All very important. But one of the skills that gets neglected is the skill of observation. You have to be able to observe the terrain to figure out how it works for you or against you. You also have to be able to observe what is in your environment. Maybe that wire that you can’t see is part of an early warning system, an antennae, or an IED.

    Hope that answers your question.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #19057
    Profile photo of DiznNC
    DiznNC
    Participant

    Holy shit, this thread is winding all over the place, but it’s all good stuff!

    1st Sgt, (not “Top” you wankers, cut the shit!), good point on the observation. My background was mostly recce, so I stressed this more than live fire shooting in the past. Although it is important, as actions in the objective area, the majority of your time is spent on patrol and OBSERVING. This deserves a separate post.

    And the glasses are important. Get clear and tinted. I like Uvex safety glasses. Cheap, readily available, and they work great. Even have ballistic rated ones.

    I will do another thread on prep for CP Training.

    CTT 1505, NODF 1505, CP 1503, LN 1, RC II, Rifleman

    #19058
    Profile photo of Rob
    busyguyintville
    Participant

    Awesome. Just the kind of info I was hoping for First Sergeant! I’d never heard of or considered the glint factor. I’ll make some adjustments to my gear.

    (Sorry for the “Top” moniker; no offense intended. I’m not in on the inside joke/story; that’s all I ever called my 1st Sergeants.)

    MVT Rifleman. TC3/RMP/CRCD Alumni.
    Southern Illinois Area

    #19074
    Profile photo of First Sergeant
    First Sergeant
    Moderator

    Awesome. Just the kind of info I was hoping for First Sergeant! I’d never heard of or considered the glint factor. I’ll make some adjustments to my gear.

    (Sorry for the “Top” moniker; no offense intended. I’m not in on the inside joke/story; that’s all I ever called my 1st Sergeants.)

    No worries. When I made my intro at CTT, Chris came out with “Top” right away. I told him just as I have told many others, I don’t spin on my head for your enjoyment. ;-)

    Hope the information is helping. As you can see from this thread, you start out trying to make a list of smaller things that sometimes get neglected and the more you discuss it the more things get added.

    Diz, this thread is all over the place. I have found that sometimes that is the best way for information to be exchanged. One question leads to another and then a completely different topic comes out of it. But information is being shared. That is the important part.

    FILO
    Signal out, can you identify.
    Je ne regrette rien...
    Klagt Nicht, Kämpft

    #19090
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Great job everyone!
    Thread deserves a sticky!

    #19137
    Profile photo of DiznNC
    DiznNC
    Participant

    On Velcro again. The comment has been made, why would it make any difference on a mag pouch. Aren’t things pretty noisy if you’re changing mags? Not all the time. After a contact your recce team breaks contact and consolidates one terrain feature away. It looks like you’re not being followed but you aren’t taking any chances. You are in a 360, and at full alert. Your team leader asks if anyone is wounded, status on ammo, water, etc. Most everybody went through 4 mags. So you need to plus up. Imagine how noisy this would be, with multiple mags pouches being ripped open to move fresh mags to your ready mag positions. And even noisier if the team leader has to re-distribute the ammo amongst you. In this case, I would want to remain as stealthy as possible, in case the enemy is still around. So mag pouches (and any pouch for that matter) with tuck tabs would be the optimum solution. This is exactly why I designed them.

    Again this is something we’ve gotten away from. Standard teams aren’t used to being stealthy. We aren’t gonna have Mother Green behind us for back-up. We will have to leave the contact area and disappear into the countryside on our own.

    CTT 1505, NODF 1505, CP 1503, LN 1, RC II, Rifleman

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 54 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.