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Situps

This topic contains 12 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Virgil Kane Virgil Kane 2 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #18394
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    I know, I know situps are bad for you but the Army PT Test is Pushups, Situps, and 2 mile run. The Situps always get me.

    What exercise can help me get over my fear of Situps?

    Also thinking about the 1-8 week Intermidate MVT tplan but is there an alternate exercise for Pullups? Other than the gym where I see my trainer once a week, There are no pullup bars around and well wife already saw d no to a pullup bar in the house due to my brother in law basically ripping a hole in the wall when he installed one.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #18398
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    – There are different schools of thought on sit ups.
    While some say the compression of discs is bad other say numbers show it doesn’t make a difference.

    My compromise is I still do them though I do not do multi set “orgies” of sit ups but just a single set.

    A popular alternative of course are crunches.

    – Pull ups are an exercise that works the back (heavily), the biceps and elements of your shoulder (a bit).
    They are an exercise that strengtheners tactical mobility by increasing your competence in climbing / over coming obstacles.
    An alternative would be properly executed bent over rows w/ dumbbell (the one where you stabilize with one arm and execute w/ the other) . This broadly works the same muscle groups albeit with IMHO lesser intensity.

    #18400
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    Thanks I will do that.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #18403

    ffhoundog- do you have any trees near you? get a set of gymnastic rings for $20 (online or at your local sporting goods store)- perfect for pullups, and toes-bar (an alternative to situps)

    #18407
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    I have lots of trees, like around 80 on my property. I will have to take a look at that. Great suggestion.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #18409
    Profile photo of 12aklabs
    12aklabs
    Participant

    For pullups, there are items like “perfect fitness gym”. It retails for $30 on Amazon. Best part is NO holes in walls. I have one. They work great.

    For an alternative to situps, do planks, reverse crunchs, leg lifts, etc. They all work the abs.

    Never give up. Never quit.

    #18410
    Profile photo of Support Side
    ffhounddog
    Participant

    That could work well. Now I just need to make sure I have a sturdy door.

    Support Side. Not flattering but better than weak side.

    #18418
    Profile photo of Kennymac
    Kennymac
    Participant

    I have this http://tinyurl.com/q5acxbu set up in my garage. Free standing, plus you can do dips and pushups on it.

    #18428
    Profile photo of Max Velocity
    Max
    Keymaster

    Planks are really all you need. Trust me when you get to the point that you can hold a plank for an hour, that’s more core strength than your ever gonna need. Nothing wrong with being superman though…

    #18478
    Profile photo of 12aklabs
    12aklabs
    Participant

    Holding planks for an hour are you nuts????? ;-)

    I can hold a plank for a minute or so. You must be superman. :-)

    Never give up. Never quit.

    #22987
    Profile photo of USMC-03
    USMC-03
    Participant

    I’m doing three or four sets of sit-ups during my core workout; arms crossed in front of me, never again behind the head. I’m also doing an equal number sets of fludder kicks and Russian crunches; seen a lot of improvement over the last eight months or so.

    "The point is that we are all capable of believing things which we know to be untrue, and then, when we are finally proved wrong, impudently twisting the facts so as to show that we were right. Intellectually, it is possible to carry on this process for an indefinite time: the only check on it is that sooner or later a false belief bumps up against solid reality, usually on a battlefield."
    George Orwell

    #23132
    Profile photo of Buddy
    Buddy
    Participant

    I will chime in as my career is in physical therapy and exercise physiology.

    There is no yes or no answer to this when talking generally. Unfortunately, a question like this is trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. After studying and looking at many cadavers over the years, I have learned that all our skeletal and muscular systems are similar to an untrained eye, but vastly different when looked at closely. These changes in structure will determine what one range of motion one joint is capable of on one person compared to another person. These anatomical changes will dictate whether an exercise(external force into muscle tissue using a mechanical structure as a vehicle for said tissue) is safe or contraindicated for a person.

    Here are the ‘nuts and bolts’ of what is occurring on the muscular system during a supine sit-up using gravity as an external force. Upon activation of the abdominal and hip musculature the moment before the torso leaves the ground, the hip flexors activate to anchor the pelvis to the ground followed by two multijoint muscles (psoas major, psoas minor) provide anterior lumbar stability into a position known as lordosis (lumbar natural curve), at the same time the spinal lumbar and lower thoracic spinal extensors (low back muscles) activate. Next as the torso begins to move further into the ‘sit-up’ the spinal flexors distal to the axis rectus abdominus, both internal and external obliques along with the the transverse abdominus activate but do not shorten substantially, this also stabilizes the spine by creating intra abdominal pressure, these tissues remain in a isometric position during the entire motion. The end result of a sit up is an isometric on the “abs” and an isotonic on the hip flexors.

    So the question remains, are they BAD for you? Potentially Yes. A typical scenario which causes joint dysfunctions in the lumbar spine is when a person goes into a sit-up and DOES NOT correctly recruit muscles for proper activation which stabilizes lordosis or their spinal structure does not allow for adequate lordosis. When this happens we find that excessive compressive and shearing force is redirected from the upper lumbar vertebrae to the lower lumbar vertebra L4-L5 and the discs in between become compressed, this can lead over time to herniated discs and other vertebral dysfunctions (osteophites, spinal stenosis, spondylitis ect.) In my opinion the risk of doing these exercises in a non controlled environment outweigh the reward. In my experience many people, are unable to correctly perform a safe sit up, that doesn’t mean it’s not possible, but slim.

    A very good compromise to ‘sit-ups’ would be to do two separate exercises which essentially create the same stimulus as a sit up. Exercise 1) crunches work the spinal flexors. Exercise 2) hanging bent leg lifts, which influence the hip flexors. Both of these exercises will achieve the same stimulus without potential risk of injury.

    LEGAL British immigrant, who embraces the freedoms of the US Constitution and lives happily in good old South Carolina(one of the last free states).

    #38037
    Profile photo of Virgil Kane
    Virgil Kane
    Participant

    I’m glad I joined here. I’ve never heard that situps can be bad. Buddy’s description makes sense. Thanks.

    What is the proper form for crunches?

    Masters II
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